Category Archives: Campaign

Barely 3 out of 10 victims qualify for Samsung’s compensation plan standards

Kim Mi-Sun, who was in charge of soldering at the Giheung Factory’s LCD line from 1997 to 2000, was diagnosed with hemiplegia, paralysis of one side of the body, in 2000, after her legs suddenly collapsed. It turned out to be a rare disease called multiple sclerosis.

Mi-sun, who couldn’t watch the news, only heard from others that Samsung had come up with a compensation plan.

“We’re all people who became sick while working for the company, and so I’m not sure what is the standard for compensating some and not others. Even though my life has been shattered, nobody knows…how frustrating…”

Full report: Against Samsung’s compensation plan

Source: stopsamsung.wordpress.com

See on Scoop.itAsian Labour Update

Resistance in Rembang, Central Java: Street and community conflict against military & police in struggle against the construction of a cement factory [Indonesia]

There is a land grabbing occuring in Rembang, Central Java, committed by one of the biggest cement corporation in Indonesia. People of Rembang, mostly women farmers, are protesting. They heavily rely on the rivers, springs, caves, fountains. It’s been more than 300 days since the women farmers in the area began camping in tents to block the trucks and heavy equipment from entering the area of the mountain… It has been a long struggle for the women farmers to fight against the establishment of the cement factory. These women, who have been fighting against the cement factory, were beaten up by the state apparatus who forced them to leave their tents. Despite the ongoing intimidation, they have kept up their fight but this month the court will determine their fate. We will keep you updated.

Source: 325.nostate.net

See on Scoop.itAsian Labour Update

Migrant worker protest in Taiwan for fairer wages

A group of activists and migrant workers protested in Taipei on March 12 urging the government to meet Indonesian demands for better treatment of its workers in Taiwan. More than 30 protesters from Indonesia, Vietnam, the Philippines and Thailand demonstrated outside the Legislative Yuan, holding placards emblazoned with the word “anti-slavery” and shouting slogans such as “minimum wage for all.” Some of the protesters chained themselves together and wore signs that read “slaves” on their clothes to protest long working hours and unfairly low wages.

Source: www.wantchinatimes.com

See on Scoop.itAsian Labour Update

Working Women of Asia 2015 Photo Contest

As we celebrate International Working Women’s Day on March 8, we are happy to announce the launching of the Working Women of Asia 2015 photo contest. We are inviting everybody to join and help in making women at work visible. The Working Women of Asia 2015 aims to highlight the invaluable contribution of women to society and their diverse kinds of work. In this photo contest we invite photographs that feature marginalised women workers in their work environment, their community, or their own homes. Join us.
All entries must be submitted in digital format via email. Send entry to womenatwork@amrc.org.hk.
For more detail, please visit: http://amrc.org.hk/content/working-women-asia-2015-photo-contest

Source: amrc.org.hk

An Open Letter to the Korean President-Elect Park Geun-hye (re Respect Workers Rights in Korea)

 

22 February 2013
The Honourable Park Geun-hye
President-Elect of the Republic of Korea
Cheong Wa Dae
1 Cheongwadae-ro
Jongno-gu
Seoul 110-820
Republic of Korea

 

Respect Workers Rights in Korea

 

Dear Madam President-Elect:

Asian Transnational Corporation Monitoring Network (ATNC) would like to bring to your attention a number of serious labour issues, which we urge your government to act upon once you assume the office of the presidency on 25 February 2013.

First, a lack of fundamental labour rights in the public sector is leading to serious political and social problems.

The Korean Government Employees Union (KGEU) is still not being recognised as a legal trade union organisation. The government has indeed refused to register the union three times. Since its founding, 137 union members are dismissed for their trade union activity. In January 2013, KGEU president Kim Jung-nam conducted a 16 days’ hunger strike before being hospitalised. The KGEU is now continuing sit-it strike in front of the National Assembly. The KGEU president and secretary-general were recently dismissed on the ground that they are leaders of an illegal organisation. In 2012, the ILO has called on the government to recognise the KGEU and allow it to carry out trade union activity. In its most recent report, the ILO Committee of Experts stated, “the Committee expressed deep regret at the gravity of the allegations involving serious acts of extensive interference in the activities of the KGEU and requested the Government to immediately cease all acts of interference.” The ILO urged the government “to take all possible measures with a view to achieving conciliation between the Government and the KGEU so that the latter may continue to exist and ultimately to register within the framework of the legislation which should be in line with freedom of association principles.”

Further, 165 public enterprise workers who are members of the Korean Federation of Public Sector and Transportation Workers’ Unions (KPTU) have been dismissed from their jobs in retaliation for legitimate union activities. Many of these workers, including 96 members of the KPTU-affiliated Korean Railway Workers’ Union, faced reprisal due to their opposition to public sector privatisation and other actions taken to defend quality public services. Others were fired in an effort to prevent legitimate efforts to improve the poor working conditions faced by irregular public enterprise workers. Dismissed public sector workers, many of whom who have been out of jobs for several years or more, suffer from economic, social and psychological hardship. Their reinstatement is essential to the normalisation of public sector labour relations and the protection of the Korean people’s right to quality public services.

Second, there have been several recent industrial disputes provoked by the growing use of precarious forms of employment despite recent court rulings against the practice, mass layoffs and the promotion of employer dominated unions. Indeed, the situation has become so bad that five union leaders and activists have taken their lives in response to the repression of their trade union activities.

At Hanjin, workers struck to protest precarious employment and the layoff of over 400 workers. At the end of strike, and an 11 month crane sit-in of Kim Jinsook, the company agreed on the reinstatement of dismissed workers and to compensation. Each side agreed to drop lawsuits against each other. However, Hanjin continued to sue the chairperson of the KMWU and the KCTU leaders for damages related to the strike in the amount of US$15.8 million and US$100,000 respectively. Even worse, the company established a management dominated “yellow” union and sought to lure the members of the KMWU. This situation drove Choe Kang-seo, the deputy organising director of KMWU Busan Regional Branch Hanjin Local, to take his life. His coffin is still lying on the cold street and his family members are urgently request for the company to have a talk with the union. However, the company has been rejecting any talk with the family members and the union so far.

At Ssangyong, 3 union leaders are sitting in on top of a high electronic pylon. The company decided in 2009 to file for bankruptcy and proposed a reorganisation plan, which was approved the following month. On April 8, 2009, the company announced its plan to dismiss 2,646 workers. In May, workers went on strike to encourage negotiations over alternative, cost-cutting measures short of mass dismissals. On June 2, the company notified 1,056 workers of their dismissal effective from 8 June. On 26 and 27 June, riot police entered the factory and secured the main building following intense fighting that resulted in several injuries and arrests. On 1 July, water was cut off and on 16 July all food was blocked from entering the plant. From 20 to 27 July, thousands of riot police and hired thugs again attempted to take the factory. This time, the police moved in with water cannons and dropped concentrated tear gas and chemicals onto the strikers from helicopters, which caused in some cases severe chemical burns. Several other workers sustained serious injuries at the hands of the police. In the end, the company brought lawsuits against individuals and union officers for obstruction of business, as well as a multimillion dollar lawsuit against the parent union – the Korean Metal Workers Union (KMWU) and the confederation, the Korean Confederation of Trade Unions. It now appears that the dismissals were completely illegal, based on false claims about the company’s economic situation. During the presidential election campaign, you made a commitment to a parliamentary investigation with regard to the Ssangyong case, but there has been no action until now.

At Hyundai Motor, a “dispatched” worker won court decisions in January 2011 and February 2012, holding that he was an “illegally dispatched labour” and not “subcontracted labour”. The courts recognised the worker as a full-time employee directly employed by Hyundai after he worked for more than two consecutive years at the plant. However, management of Hyundai refused to implement the ruling, which it announced on August 2012. Following the company’s denial, the Korean Metal Workers’ Union (KMWU) initiated an industrial action for the regularisation of all subcontracted workers who work for more than two years. The company responded with lawsuits requesting damages of 16.2 billion won for strikes and sit-ins at the Ulsan, Asan, and Jeonju plants. The ILO examined this case and requested that the government develop, in consultation with the social partners, appropriate mechanisms aimed at strengthening the protection of subcontracted/agency workers’ rights, “so as to prevent any abuse of subcontracting as a way to evade in practice the exercise by these workers of their trade union rights”.

At Yooseong Piston Ring (YPR), a major supplier of piston rings for Hyundai Motor as well as to four other major auto assemblers in Korea, had signed an agreement with the Korean Metal Workers’ Union locals at the YPR Asan and Yeong-dong plant to implement a 2 day-shift system with a monthly wage and no night work beginning January 2011. The agreement was meant to respond to sleep disorders and other health issues related to night work. However, in 2011 the 2 day-shift system was not implemented in YPR and the company refused to bargain in good faith to find solutions to implement the 2 day-shift system. On 18 May, the union locals held a 2 hours’ trade union education for the day shift union members. Hours later, the company undertook an illegal lockout. Later on, during a parliamentary audit, it was revealed that this all was intentionally conducted according to the company’s long-term strategy to bust the union. Indeed, YSR had hired the Changjo Consultant, a professional union busting company. The union filed 23 complaints regarding the company’s unfair labour practise to the Ministry of Employment and Labour. The Ministry sent the case to the public prosecutors with the opinion that the CEO of the company should be investigated under detention. However, no action has been taken, leading the union leader to conduct an aerial protest on the guardrail of a bridge.

In many industrial disputes, companies have used a much criticised “obstruction of business” law to seek arrests and devastating fines for engaging in strikes. The ILO has repeatedly criticised the government’s use of this law, urging the government “to consider all possible measures, in consultation with the social partners concerned, so as to revert to a general practice of investigation without detention of workers and of refraining from making arrests, even in the case of an illegal strike, if the latter does not entail any violence.”

ATNC calls upon your government to: 1) recognise the KGEU and to reinstate the 137 KGEU members and 165 KPTU members fired for their union activities; 2) seek the amendment of the “obstruction of business” law so that union leaders or members are no longer subject to arrest or to enormous fines for activity related to industrial disputes; 3) urge Hanjin Heavy Industry to withdraw their lawsuit against the union’s leader and reinstate the dismissed workers; 4) work with Parliament to launch an investigation into the Ssangyong mass layoffs as promised and to ensure the reinstatement of dismissed workers; 5) urge Hyundai, and indeed the manufacturing industry, to respect the Supreme Court’s decision with regard to the use of in-house dispatch work; and 6) take enforcement actions against anti-union retaliation by employers and the establishment of company unions, especially in YPR.

We thank you for your urgent attention to these matters.

Yours sincerely
Asian Transnational Corporation Monitoring Network

Endorsed and co-signed by
Korean House for International Solidarity (KHIS), Republic of Korea
Asia Monitor Resource Centre (AMRC), Hong Kong
Labour Action China (LAC), Hong Kong
Ecumenical Institute for Labor Education and Research (EILER), Philippines
Thai Labour Campaign (TLC), Thailand
National Free Trade Union (NFTU), Sri Lanka
Coalition of Cambodian Apparel Workers’ Democratic Union (CCAWDU), Cambodia
Globalization Monitor (GM), Hong Kong
Centre for Workers Education (CWE), India
Sedane Labor Resource Center (LIPS), Indonesia
Independent Democracy of Informal Economy Association (IDEA), Cambodia
Serve the People Association (SPA), Taiwan
Youth Labor Union 95
Endorsed and co-signed by
Korean House for International Solidarity (KHIS), Republic of Korea
Asia Monitor Resource Centre (AMRC), Hong Kong
Labour Action China (LAC), Hong Kong
Ecumenical Institute for Labor Education and Research (EILER), Philippines
Thai Labour Campaign (TLC), Thailand
National Free Trade Union (NFTU), Sri Lanka
Coalition of Cambodian Apparel Workers’ Democratic Union (CCAWDU), Cambodia
Globalization Monitor (GM), Hong Kong
Centre for Workers Education (CWE), India
Sedane Labor Resource Center (LIPS), Indonesia
Independent Democracy of Informal Economy Association (IDEA), Cambodia
Serve the People Association (SPA), Taiwan
Youth Labor Union 95
Labour Education and Service Network (LESN), Hong Kong
National Garment Workers Federation (NGWF), Bangladesh

cc:
Ministry of Employment and Labour
Ministry of Public Administration and Security
KCTU
KMWU
KGEU
KPTU

Statement to the Fire at the Factory of Tazreen Fashions Killing over Hundreds in Dhaka, Bangladesh

 

 

28 November 2012

For Immediate Release

 

Statement to the Fire at the Factory of Tazreen Fashions Killing over Hundreds in Dhaka, Bangladesh

Besides conveying our deepest condolence and concerns to all victims, Asian Transnational Corporations Monitoring Network (ATNC) is calling for an immediate action from the Bangladeshi government and international clothing brands following the deadly fire at the factory of Tazreen Fashions on late Saturday, 24 November 2012.

At least 112 deaths are confirmed and hundreds of workers injured when they jumped from high windows in order to escape the smoke and flames. These killed and injured workers made clothes for Hong Kong-based Li & Fung on behalf of various international brands, such as C & A, Carrefour, KIK and Walmart.

Li & Fung is one of the largest apparel sourcing companies in the world.  Regrettably, this multinational enterprise has a poor track record of not respecting labour rights for many years.  Despite the company’s vow to comply with their codes of conducts and corporate social responsibility throughout the production and sourcing process, injustices and deadly accidents continue to happen.  Before this deadly factory fire inBangladesh, a Turkish garment factory called Hey Tekstil which produced for Li & Fung was also found of having an outbreak of workers’ protest this year.  Hundreds of workers, who are owed more than 4.7 million euro, protested at Li & Fung office inIstanbulto demand for compensation.  However, the compensation is yet undone.  Adding more wounds to workers, theBangladeshfire once again revealed the negligence and irresponsibility of Li & Fung in upholding labour rights.

Li & Fung and the international buyers such as Walmart and C & A have an undeniable responsibility in compensating the workers.  Let us be clear.  Playing a blame game with other parts of the supply chain is in violation of the UN Business and Human Rights guidelines.  All the companies concerned should uphold their due diligence and their obligation to mediate.

ATNC demands:-

1.    Li & Fung and other international buyers of Tazreen Factory should pay full and fair compensation to the victims and their families.

2.    Li & Fung and other international brand companies should be obliged to comply with national and international health and safety measures, whichever is a higher standard, in a serious manner through their annual audit on the health and safety standards.

3.    The manufacturers as well as the international brand companies should ensure all the supply-chain factories are manufacturing under the satisfactory working conditions where both national and international health and safety standards are strictly not violated. Any improvements should be carried out.

4.    The Bangladeshi Government to set up an independent and transparent body to investigate the causes of this fire and to examine whether there is any ongoing negligence in failing to comply with both national and international health and safety standards to garment factories. The Government should take appropriate legal action to prosecute when necessary. Also, this body should look into the redress for all victims.

Should there be any enquiries, please contact the spokesperson of ATNC, Mr. Jason Chan on +852 2815-9003 or email at coordinator@atnc.asia.

 

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